Kinsale ~ Full Moon

Eddie and Kevin adrift on the Yeoconimico River

 

The last 60 miles are really rural, all winter wheat and young corn. The last 10 miles especially so – nothing else, just clouds and trees and blue skies. Going out is also going back, way back in time. Kinsale was another steamboat landing on the Chesapeake. The Yeoconimico River is a deep and sheltered harbor, several miles long, with many side tributaries. A village grew up around the comings and goings of the steamboats back in the late 1800’s,  and it hasn’t been much else since. The little town must have prospered back then, though. Old storefronts still line what must have been Main Street, just a block long, and a little village square. Well kept houses, stately and demur.

Now a grain depot occupies the old landing, all silos and conveyors, and is doing a brisk business. A barge (there’s only room for one at a time), is pushed up alongside the wharf by a small tug, gets loaded with wheat seven days a week during the harvest, which is in full swing. Trucks lined up on the narrow lane down to the water. The wharf is so small that only one end of the barge can be loaded at a time, tipping lopsided under the weight. When one end is full, they turn the barge around and load the other end.

Continue reading “Kinsale ~ Full Moon”

Retro Repost #17 ~ Contour Lines

Scottsville, Virginia

Shaping and sanding with long board and cabinet scrapers. I prefer scrapers, used on the left side, and the patch in the middle of the sanded side on the right for comparison.

About this this time of year, several years ago.

I remember enjoying this part, though it was a lot of work and seemed to go on forever.

 

Strange Winter

Two days ago it was warm and sunny. Last night it was bitter and snowing hard with the moon and stars were visible in a clear sky above, blowing horizontal out of the mountains.

Today the high was 35 degrees. Day after tomorrow the high will be almost 80.

Weird.

 

 

 

Friends in Fine Places

Barred Island, Maine

A great trip to Maine, we were very sorry to leave. Plenty of great stuff to post in the coming weeks.

 

 

While in Brooklin we got to meet the nice folks at OffCenterHarbor. They had several new videos in the works, one of which is an introduction to small craft festivals and raids around the world, including St. Michaels. In the video just released, several boats seen here in our Chesapeake fleet, good friends, make some notable appearances. If you look close, you may also notice short clips from videos posted here in the past.

Much of their footage was shot at the Small Reach Regatta (SRR) there in Brooklin. Most of our local fleet gathered there again this year with other boats from all over. Harris and Barbara in Mabu, Eddie and his daughter Leney in Una . . . Great seeing them on the big screen. They make it pretty clear why this sort of small boat sailing is so addictive.

The two boats, Mabu and Una, are sailing side by side at the beginning of a video shot on a beautiful windless day we spent last fall on the Chickahominy:

 

Sea of Glass series of posts starts here

 

Eddie has a post up on his blog about their trip to SRR, along with a link to a beautiful set of photos by Leney.

Lingering Lunacy – Una Cameos

Lingering Lunacy – A Week in Maine

I know the OCH crew is out in Port Townsend at the moment for the festival there this weekend, and hope they bring back more good material we’ll see soon. In the meantime, one they made a couple of years ago is available to watch outside the paywall:

 

 

Here on the east coast, we have MASCF (Mid-Atlantic Small Craft Festival) coming up in a few weeks in St. Michaels. When the festival last year had to be cancelled in advance of a hurricane, it sort of left a hole in a season of great sailing for most of us. We’re all really looking forward to it this year.