Christmas in August

It’s Winter in the Southern Hemisphere. It hasn’t snowed in Wellington, New Zealand, for 30 years. The average age of a New Zeallander is 26. So that was before most of the current population was alive.

It did today, just a few hours ago.

Someone caught it on film rather nicely.

 

 

Words define our world, and how we see it. And if we see it.

Recent research is showing that, in some areas of thought, when we don’t have a word for something it becomes invisible to us. So what is clear to people of one culture, who have a word for a thing, is obscure or nonexistent to another that does not. If a tree falls in the woods, and we don’t have a word for it . . . ? How about how you feel today emotionally? How much does that alter what you see? Turns out, a lot.

Short article here:

 

http://www.petapixel.com/2011/08/12/do-people-always-see-the-same-things-when…

(sorry, looks like the video has been removed. 11/11/11)

 

 

 

Via Metafilter

 

After Rain, Treefrogs

 

 

Gray Treefrogs are nearly invisible, but you find them everywhere. They look like lichen-covered tree bark, and during the day hide silent as stones under tools in the yard, upturned buckets, the siding on the house, etc..

If you pick one up, and open your hand to look, it will leap onto the nearest treelike object, which is usually your wife or daughter, or perhaps the gentleman at the door endeavoring to interest you in the salvation of your soul. Indeed, they do. They cling with a wet thwack, like a soggy noodle, to roughly the same place you’d stick a lapel pin, or boutonnière.

At night, after a summer storm, they get out of hand in other ways, in which they make the loud noises, instead of their startled landing sites.